Psalm #14

I was listening to an old favorite, John Michael Talbot, on the way to the office. He was singing an adapted version of Psalm 95--come worship the Lord; for we are his people, the flock that he shepherds. The words gave rise to the psalm below.

For those of you who have been regulars around here, you know I've taken an extended break.  I've been learning to listen a little better; at least, I hope. Maybe I'll share more about that in the coming days. For now, though, enjoy Psalm #14.

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Psalm #14

Come worship the Lord,

in the way of reflective, not reflexive breath, in the way that counts the all of everything as imagination born, as the objects of the most sobering intoxicant.

For we are his people,

and in that way, we are the all of his everything, the best of wind, and dust, and Word, the image of Images, each.

We were the ancient sages, are the new saints; We are the culmination of the great creative pride, the have been stars, could be stars, and will be stars again.

Bear the notion that we are beautiful, the coming collective of hymns,

the flock that he shepherds.

 Hallelujah!

To John the Prophet (an Advent Post)

"Worship is the natural overflow of those who, with humble and grateful heart, understand their place in the universe and live in awe of a God who made it so."~Joan Chittister, The Liturgical Year

This week, our small community of close friends lit the first Advent candle, a pecan pie Yankee Candle to be precise. We aren’t sticklers for formality. Kaitlin, holding her own swaddled baby, raised her voice a capella.

O come, o come, Emmanuel,” she sang. And we joined her.

We read the prophets, sank deep into knowledge that they spoke of the coming King. They foretold the feast day celebration, how Messiah would set things right.

And ransom captive Israel who mourns in lonely exile still until the son of God appears.

The prophets were speaking to ancient Israel, a stubborn people following their every whim. But they were speaking to us too. We who are equally stubborn. We who are perhaps more whimsical. The prophets tell us Messiah is coming; they shout it from timeless texts. They tell us that he will reorder all things, that the government will be upon his shoulders. Christ is coming to set us free, they say!

Rejoice! Rejoice! Emanuel shall come to thee oh Israel!

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John Blase wrote good words this week, asked the Adventists to move through contemplation and into sing-song carols of praise. And if you read between the lines, he encouraged loud ballyhooing, boisterous proclamations that Christ is coming and the darkness will not prevail. Yes, there are modern-day prophets who speak timeless words.

Advent is here. I’ll read and contemplate, sure. But I’ll also sing, “Rejoice! Rejoice!” and “Let every heart prepare Him room.” Because the Christ-child deserves worship, and not the star-spangled kind, but the kind that recognizes that He’s coming to reorder all things.

If you have a minute, would you swing by John's place today? I think there might be something there for you.